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2022 WCQ: Fifa gives Ghana Nov. 20 deadline to respond to South Africa protest

World football governing body, Fifa, has given the Ghana Football Association (GFA) up to November 20 to respond to South Africa’s “dubious” penalty claims in Sunday’s 2022 World Cup qualifier.

Ghana defeated South Africa 1-0 at the Cape Coast Sports Stadium in a Group G decider of the African qualifiers for the next year’s World Cup in Qatar courtesy of an Andre Ayew penalty to qualify for the playoffs.

The South African Football Association, who felt it was not a penalty, has filed a protest to Fifa to investigate the Senegal referee and his team and order a replay of the match.

Fifa in a statement signed by its Head of Judiciary Bodies and sent both football associations of Ghana and South Africa, acknowledging receipt of the protest.

It adds that it will be submitted to its Disciplinary Committee on November 23 for consideration and a decision will be taken.

The GFA has been told to respond to the allegations in the attached file by November 20, if any at all, and judgement will be based on the documents it has.

“We wish to inform the South African Football Association as well as the Ghana Football Association that the above-mentioned protest will be submitted to a member of the Fifa Disciplinary Committee on 23 November 2021, for consideration and decision in accordance with art. 14 (9) of the Regulations Fifa World Cup 2022.

“In view of this, the Ghana Football Association has the opportunity to provide the secretariat of the Fifa Disciplinary Committee with any comments it deems appropriate on aforementioned protest, if any, by 20 November 2021, along with any document deemed necessary.

“Finally, for the sake of clarity, please be informed that the Fifa Disciplinary Committee will decide on the protest using the file in its possession.”

 

By Adamu Benin Abdul Karim | www.sportyafrica.com

 

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